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ETHICAL FASHION BRANDS

In a world of fast fashion, poor labour conditions, and a culture of constant consumerism, it can be difficult to keep up with fashion trends while still shopping ethically. But no matter your budget or

In a world of fast fashion, poor labour conditions, and a culture of constant consumerism, it can be difficult to keep up with fashion trends while still shopping ethically. But no matter your budget or your beliefs, you can look fashionable with these ethical brands at a range of price points.

 

STELLA MCCARTNEY

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Daughter of vegetarian activist Linda McCartney and Beatle Paul McCartney, this fashion designer has always been staunchly opposed to using animal byproducts, enjoying success as the first fully vegetarian luxury clothing brand. After recent controversy where multiple fashion brands were selling real fur labelled as faux, she reaffirmed her beliefs, saying that she would never use leather, skins, feathers or fur in her designs. The brand is also committed to supporting fair working conditions and reducing the environmental impact of their manufacture. As their website says – “We will probably never be perfect, but you can rest assured that we are always trying.”

 

PEOPLE TREE

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Ethics-conscious style doesn’t have to be all hessian fabrics and shapeless printed shift dresses. People Tree is an accredited Fairtrade clothing company, meaning that all their garments are made by workers who work in good conditions and are paid a fair wage. With an emphasis on traditional skills to produce “slow fashion” such as handmade jewellery and woven dresses, People Tree combines sustainability and style, with prices that aren’t much higher than the high street.

 

OSBORN SHOES

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It’s been recently announced (not that we all didn’t know already) that mass-produced, cheap shoes can cause irreversible foot problems and nerve damage later in life. Artists and makers Carla Venticinque-Osborn and Aaron Osborn take us back to the traditional methods of cobblers with their shoe brand. Their Fairtrade operation employs artisan weavers in Guatemala to make their stunning, fashion-forward footwear.

 

THRIFT SHOPPING

Buying ethically can be expensive, even if you look hard for affordable brands and shop on sale. But buying second hand or vintage is another way you can get new fashion pieces without giving money to high street stores with labour practices you don’t feel comfortable with. Many thrift stores support charity organisations – find your favourite and search their rails for your next bargain beauty.

Cassie Doney is a writer based in the UK, too bad her accent can't be heard through her writing but we promise you, it's there and we love it. She loves to write and speaks her mind.

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