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Don’t trust the famous: If a celebrity is endorsing a food, it is probably not good for you

If you have an Instagram account, you have seen a celebrity endorsing a food, a snack, a shake, a juice. They list all of the pros and really seem to enjoy it and consume it

If you have an Instagram account, you have seen a celebrity endorsing a food, a snack, a shake, a juice. They list all of the pros and really seem to enjoy it and consume it everyday. Hopefully, this won’t come as a surprise: You shouldn’t eat a food just because a celebrity put their name on it. According to a new study from the NYU Langone Medical Center, chances are that food is probably not healthy at all.

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Marketers love celebrities

Justin Timberlake, Maroon 5, Baauer, Britney Spears and will.i.am alone accumulated 313 million views on YouTube.  Sixty-five celebrities were collectively associated with 57 different food and beverage brands owned by 38 parent companies.  Having celebrities endorse products have long been a means of marketing  foods and drinks. And with the rise of social media, as Instagram stars take advantage of their huge followings to make money, the situation is even better for both sides.

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It’s a million dollar machine

The explosion of social media has really changed the game for celebrities endorsements. It’s an entirely new model, and it thrives off of a gray area. When you see a coconut water in a Kylie Jenner post, you might expect to see a product name in her hashtags. But what is her deal? What is she getting out of the agreements?

According with Jezebel, “a sponsored Instagram post with a top fashion blogger can cost a brand anywhere from $5,000 to $25,000 — nearly five times the going rates just a year and a half ago. And that’s relatively small potatoes for brands that reportedly shell out $100,000 to $300,000 for a single sponsored Instagram post from Kylie Jenner.”

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No vegetables, no fruits, no good

The most rare product advertised by the artists are fruits, vegetables, or whole grains. Most of what was posted on social media is regular soda, sweets, fast food, or diet drinks, and 81% of the products were deemed “nutrient poor” by the Nutrient Profile Model, according to Glamour magazine.

When it comes to their own recipe or some A-lister recipe book, celebrities are Instagramming their healthy food, too. From Gwyneth’s matcha lattes to Chrissy Teigen’s “rabbit food,” artists prefer to share their creations. Maybe it’s a way to show they don’t eat what they sell.

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How influential are celebrities?

Thankfully, celebrities are less influential than you’d have thought. According to studies from Ace Metrix, 51% of the population feel that celebrities make little to no difference in their decision maker when buys a product. 55% even believe that celebrities’ negative publicity can have a somewhat damaging impact on the issue they’re promoting. Some celebrities seemed more trustworthy than others. Which celebrity had the best result? Ellen Degeneres seemed to have the higher score among other artists.

Juliana Torres is based in LA, an awesome person that likes to read, be read and get notice for her talented, crafted writing. All for women, by women.

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